Books

10 places every literary fan should visit

1. The Long Room at the Library of Trinity College Dublin

Built in the early 1700s, tourists come from all over the world to see this magnificent library. Located in the heart of Dublin city, its awe-inspiring bookshelves are lined with some of Ireland’s oldest books. You can also peer at the Book of Kells, an illustrated manuscript written around the year 800.

Continue reading “10 places every literary fan should visit”

Theatre

From the West End to Broadway: Theatre in London and New York City

London’s West End and New York’s Broadway have become iconic for the quality of their theatre. The Victoria and Albert Museum in Kensington is celebrating 40 years of the Olivier Awards and is marking this with a free exhibition called ‘Curtain Up’. Continue reading “From the West End to Broadway: Theatre in London and New York City”

Theatre, Writing

Shakespeare 400 years on: more myth than man?

Much mystery surrounds the legend that is Shakespeare. We don’t know much about his early life, how he began his career in the theatre, or even whether some of his most iconic creations are really his work at all.

The shadow of his status makes him more myth than man. But maybe that’s part of his appeal. That shroud of secrecy lends itself well to his legacy.

Continue reading “Shakespeare 400 years on: more myth than man?”

Writing

Review: One-day Urban Writing Retreat, London

It’s quickly clear that Charlie Haynes has hit on an entrepreneurial concept that works: writers will pay good money to sit in a room without the distractions of the phone or the Internet.

Continue reading “Review: One-day Urban Writing Retreat, London”

Journalism

Interview with Helen Youngs, Chair of the Society of Young Publishers

In honour of World Book Day this week, Marése O’Sullivan spoke to the new Chair of The Society of Young Publishers (SYP), Helen Youngs, to find out about her publishing career so far, being impressed by famous people and what her plans are for the SYP.

Continue reading “Interview with Helen Youngs, Chair of the Society of Young Publishers”

Journalism

City University London: The journey begins…

Three weeks in and I’m still amazed to be here.

Image courtesy of city.ac.uk

Back when I first came to a talk at City University London in April 2012 and experienced the passion that everyone in the department has for journalism, the idea of studying an MA here overpowered me.

Continue reading “City University London: The journey begins…”

Film, Journalism

Women and Hollywood: A Review of the WFTV Discussion

The perception of women in Hollywood is fraught with judgement and jealousy.

Even now, women in the film and television industry are being sized up not on their talent, but on their appearance.

Why are studios determining the right person for the job based on their sex?  Continue reading “Women and Hollywood: A Review of the WFTV Discussion”

Theatre

Review: Les Misérables, Queen’s Theatre, London

I was struck by the sheer intensity of the production, as it was the first time I had ever seen Les Misérables live in its legacy of nearly three decades.

The setting of revolutionary France was enhanced by the powerful bass tones of the orchestra. The cast was truly an ensemble. Continue reading “Review: Les Misérables, Queen’s Theatre, London”

Photography, Theatre

Photos from London Town, February 2013

Click each picture to enlarge.

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With Danielle Hope, who plays Éponine in the stage show Les Misérables
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En route to see Les Misérables at the Queen’s Theatre, Shaftesbury Avenue
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With Jamie Ward, who plays Marius
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Who Do You Think You Are Live: Tessa Dunlop interviews Samantha Womack
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Outside the Queen’s Theatre
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WDYTYA Live: Richard III talk
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Les Mis
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A choir sings at the Victoria and Albert Museum

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Books, Writing

Writing Tip of the Day: Sebastian Faulks

“I prefer books, ultimately, which are prepared to risk being idealistic than ones which prefer to stay on the safe ground of being critical. It seems a more daring and more interesting thing to do.

Image courtesy of Deborah Feingold/The Guardian

Of course it’s a high-tariff dive, and you risk falling flat on your face and indeed opening yourself up to the sort of people who haven’t taken a step off the safe island,

but there it is, these seem to be more worthwhile books to write.”

– SEBASTIAN FAULKS